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Showing posts with label iran. Show all posts
Showing posts with label iran. Show all posts

Sunday, March 30, 2014

History of Saffron What is Saffron?


Said to be “possibly the first spice ever used by man,” saffron has been identified as a distinct popularity since the dawn of culinary traditions. Its history spans throughout the world and into our kitchens, first known to be the herb of the sun and now used in a variety of ways inside the home and out. The name evolved from the Middle East, collaborating the words Saharan and za’faran to make saffron. These tiny ‘thread-like’ filaments are dried stigmas coming from flowering plant, the Crocus. Even before saffron livened up cuisine, it was known for its incredible dyeing ability. For a weaver in ancient times, it brought about brilliance to rugs, togas, saris, shawls, lace, and linen, silk. For the artist, the vividness of yellow was achieved. For medicinal purposes, it gave hope to some suffering from smallpox, kidney disease, insomnia, indigestion, and signified fear for others. Last but not least, for cooks, saffron allowed the brightness of the sun to be placed on a dining table. One of the few spices not to have originated in India or the tropics, saffron’s discovery is one of mystery. Although recorded history started after the cultivation of saffron, it is known that crocus plants are native to the Mediterranean and the Balkans. Thus, the early Persian civilizations spread this “wealth” with surrounding areas such as the Indus Valley and the western shores of the Mediterranean. In present day, saffron is growing in popularity in many countries throughout the world such as Iran. It is used in the most exquisite gourmet cuisine from the west to the Far East; it’s cultivated in temperate climates and delivered to a variety of different cultures. One of the most well known areas where saffron is grown is in Iran. This geographic center encompasses five provinces that have the ideal climate for saffron to thrive. It is undoubtedly true that Iran where the summers are unbearably hot and the winters are uncontrollably frigid. Iran is not only a great harvesting ground; moreover, the best quality saffron is produced there.

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

Iran exports saffron to US after 4 years

ILNA: Iran has started exporting saffron to the United States after 4 years.
Based on Iran Customs Administration’s latest report, the country exported 85,476 kilograms of saffron worth over $125.59 million in the first three quarters of the current Iranian calendar year (which started on March 21).
Iran exports saffron to over 30 countries including Russia, Germany, Switzerland, England, France, Spain, Canada, Turkey, Belgium, Scotland, Sweden, Oman, the United Arab Emirates, Estonia, Bahrain, Philippines, Malaysia, Brazil, South Africa, Qatar, Japan, Kuwait, India, China, and Saudi Arabia.
Iranian IRNA News Agency reported in October that the country’s Customs Administration has removed duty on saffron exports.
“Exports of saffron at any volume and amount will be free from duties,” said in a statement.
The secretary of the National Iranian Saffron Council, Farshid Manouchehri, said in May that Iran’s saffron exports will increase by 15 percent in the current Iranian calendar year.
Manouchehri added that Iran exported 126 tons of saffron, valued at $384 million, to different countries in the past Iranian calendar year.
The volume of saffron exports is anticipated to reach about 140 tons in the current year, he added.
By ILNA